Do Not Delay Medical Treatment After an Accident

Woman injured getting out of vehicle

After any kind of car accident, you need to seek medical attention – whether you feel hurt or not. There is no good reason to delay medical treatment and doing so could hurt your case if you decide to file a personal injury lawsuit in the future.

If you’re worried about the cost of medical care, know that it’s much cheaper to seek treatment and be reimbursed for your medical bills than it is to lose an insurance claim because you did not seek treatment right away. Additionally, you cannot put a price on your health and safety after an accident, and doctors will be able to detect serious injuries even if your symptoms have yet to emerge.

What About COVID-19 Related Delays?

You may be nervous about going to a medical facility during the COVID-19 pandemic, but rest assured that hospitals, urgent cares, and doctor’s offices are taking every precaution to keep you safe. Delaying treatment is much more dangerous than the risk of catching COVID-19 in a facility with strict safety protocols in place.

When you see your provider, make sure you tell them your visit is related to a car accident. All car crashes are considered traumatic events, and trauma care is different than the regular care you receive when you visit the doctor. Usually, you will have a 1-page document explaining what happened that you can bring to your medical facility, but during the pandemic, the Hawaii Police Department (HPD) offers these forms online.

Waiting for this document can cause a 2-week delay, but you do not need this document to seek treatment. Simply tell your healthcare provider what happened and submit the form when you get it.

Delaying your treatment not only puts your health at risk but also raises a major red flag in any car accident claims you try to make.

Insurance companies – and the HPD – will argue that if you were truly hurt in an accident, you would not have delayed medical treatment. Your concerns about COVID-19, payments, and paperwork are valid, but the insurance company will treat them like illegitimate excuses to avoid paying for your medical bills and other losses.

Do not put your health and future at risk – do not delay medical treatment after an accident! (Even during COVID-19).

How to Get Reimbursed for Medical Bills and Other Expenses

Hawaii is a no-fault car accident state, so your car insurance company will pay for your medical bills (within the limits of your policy) no matter who is at fault for your accident. If you suffer serious injuries or need more resources to pay your medical bills and cover other damages, you may be able to file an insurance claim against the at-fault driver’s insurance company or file a personal injury lawsuit against the driver.

As long as you seek treatment immediately after your car accident and gather documentation and other evidence as soon as it becomes available, insurance companies and the at-fault driver should either pay your medical bills and other expenses or reimburse you for anything you had to pay out-of-pocket.

If you are having trouble recovering the compensation you deserve, Attorney Daniel Pagliarini can help. With island values and more than 30 years of experience in injury law, we can help you get the money you are entitled to.

Simply call us at (808) 400-7248 or contact us online to schedule your free consultation and learn more about your rights and legal options today.

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